Japanese Cuisine · Japanese Whisky Reviews

Akashi Tai White Oak Red Review: Gloriously Sweet And Easy To Drink

Akashi Tai White Oak Red review

Japanese whisky features a range of unique tastes that sets it apart from Scotch and Irish. Whether it’s the fiery punch of Hibiki Harmony or the more subdued flavour of Nikka Coffey Grain, Japan knows how to produce a damn good drink.

Some of the best alcoholic drinks are the ones that take you by surprise and challenge how you thought they were going to taste. This was the case when I had a glass of Akashi Tai White Oak Red.

Sweetness for days

The Akashi Tai White Oak Red caught me off guard because of its unique profile. It tastes much sweeter than other kinds of Japanese whisky. A pleasant aroma of baked bread and lemongrass emanates from the glass. Hints of Bakewell tart, red velvet cake and oats appear on the palate.

The whisky has a smooth finish that continues to build in the throat. Not only was the White Oak Red easy to drink, it had a mouth-watering quality that puts you in the mind of biting into your favourite dessert.

Standing apart from other whiskies

The sweetness from the White Oak Red comes from how it’s crafted. It’s a blended whisky that contains 30% malt and 70% grain whisky, which is matured in American oak barrels for five years. The blending process takes place at the Eigashima (White Oak) distillery in the city of Akashi.

I’d consider the Akashi Tai White Oak Red to be a great entry level Japanese whisky. It’s not as overpowering as some of the other types. Purchase a bottle and let me know what you think.  

3 thoughts on “Akashi Tai White Oak Red Review: Gloriously Sweet And Easy To Drink

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