Book Reviews

In The Miso Soup Review: Revealing The Dark Heart Of Japan

Japan is known for its beauty and rich history, but the country has a dark side that isn’t explored as much as it could be. Japan’s seedy underbelly is exposed by Ryu Murakami’s In The Miso Soup, which focuses on the sex trade and Tokyo nightlife. Kenji, a young tour guide, takes an American tourist called Frank on a journey. But Frank is far more sinister than he appears to be and it’s not long before Kenji is dragged into a nightmare he wishes he could escape from. Continue reading “In The Miso Soup Review: Revealing The Dark Heart Of Japan”

Book Reviews

Killing Commendatore Review: A Beautiful Tale Of Loneliness, Love And Triumph

When it comes to Japanese fiction, Haruki Murakami is the name that usually jumps out at me first. His surreal stories, which mix Japanese and Western themes together, can be as poignant as they are hilarious. So, when I came across his latest novel, Killing Commendatore, I was excited to dive into a new world of weird happenings and emotional characters. I’m pleased to say the book exceeded my expectations and delivered on everything fans have come to enjoy about a classic Murakami tale. Continue reading “Killing Commendatore Review: A Beautiful Tale Of Loneliness, Love And Triumph”

Book Reviews

An Artist Of The Floating World Review: Rebirth Is As Beautiful As A Cherry Blossom

One of my goals for 2019 is to read more widely, and that involves becoming familiar with authors from different backgrounds. I recently picked up An Artist of the Floating World by Kazuo Ishiguro. Ishiguro has established himself as a talented storyteller and I was drawn to the novel because of my fascination with Japan. The book features a post WW2 Japan recovering from its scars and looking towards the future. Continue reading “An Artist Of The Floating World Review: Rebirth Is As Beautiful As A Cherry Blossom”

Book Reviews

The Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories Review

When I think of Japanese authors, the first name that comes to mind is Haruki Murakami. His surreal fiction is a big hit with western audiences and reading his stories opened a gateway for me to other Japanese writers. So, it’s appropriate that Murakami introduces The Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories. The collection covers traditional Japanese themes like bushido and bizarre situations like UFOS, sugar-filled vaginas and nightmarish paintings. But what unites all the stories is a genuine love of writing from each author. Continue reading “The Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories Review”